Learning Kuswika Madu-a-Ndele (sS-mdw-nTr)

  • Number of students: 0
  • Teacher: Asar Imhotep
  • Released: 13-05-2015
  • Level: Beginner
  • Lesson Release: One lesson per week
Certificate:

No certificate is given for this course

Description

Introduction to Middle Egyptian & Hieroglyphics (3) An introduction to the language and script of Ancient Egypt, familiarizing the student with grammar, syntax and lexicon.

This course is offered as a basic introduction to that stage in the evolution of the Egyptian language known as "Middle Egyptian" (used as a vernacular c. 2300-1700BC, and as a "literary" dialect c. 2200-1350BC). First encountered in caption texts and snippets of conversation of the workers and peasants in late Old Kingdom mastaba depictions, Middle Egyptian originally was the vernacular of the "street" during the outgoing Old Kingdom. In the upheaval that swept away the monarchy and elite of the Old Kingdom the language which characterized the Pharaonic court (Old Egyptian) was swept away as well. In the subsequent First Intermediate Period, the language that everyone speaks is a lower class register. Middle Egyptian was given a fillip shortly after the turn of the millennium when the new regime of the 12th Dynasty (c. 1991-1786 BC) established a writing school and adopted this dialect as the accepted literary medium. The scribes of this institution produced a number of literary pieces, hymns and poetry which although created in writing, were intended for oral dissemination parlando. They rapidly became classics and were copied and learned by heart for centuries into the future. Middle Egyptian was used in every walk of life from monumental inscriptions, religious, and mortuary texts to letters, business documents and accounts, and the output from Dyn. 12 through 18 was prodigious. Even beyond the 14th Century BC learned scribes would continue to make the attempt at composing in Middle Egyptian, even though the language was no longer spoken, and as a quasi-ecclesiastical speech it continued down to Greco-Roman times. By that time its restriction to temple texts gave the false impression that both language and script had always had the purpose of conveying religious concepts, hence the Greek misnomer 'hieroglyphs', i.e. holy script.

Price

Plan Name Price
1 Month: $ 50

Teacher

Asar Imhotep

Asar Imhotep is a software developer, Cultural Theorist and Africana researcher from Houston, TX whose research focus is the cultural, linguistic and philosophical links between the Ancient Egyptian civilizations and modern Bantu cultures of central and South Africa. He has a B.A. in Computer Information Systems (CIS) from the University of Houston, with a double minor in African-American and African studies. He is currently continuing his education in Computer Science with a concentration in Artificial Intelligence.

Asar is the founder of the Madu-Ndela Institute for the Advancement of Science and Culture. He is the author of such works as Where is the Love? How language can reorient us back to love’s purpose (2015), and Nsw.t Bjt.j [NOTE: pronounced NesuBiti] (King)in Ancient Egyptian: A lesson in paronymy and leadership (2016). He has contributed chapters to academic works including The Encyclopedia of African Religion (2008) edited by Molefi Asante and AmaMazama; and Unite et Pluralite de la Verite: Melangesenl’Honneur du Prof. Dr. Alphonse NginduMushete,Vol. I (2014) edited by R. MalabaMpoyi and KalambaNsapo. Asar Imhotep is a frequent contributor and presenter at the Cheikh Anta Diop International Conferences, and was also presented the DISA Award for “Intellectual Initiative and Academic Action” in 2015.

Asar is a noted speaker and philosopher and is currently organizing efforts in a nation-wide venture titled The African-American Cultural Development Project—a national project aimed at creating a framework for an African-American culture which will help vitally stimulate the economic, political, scientific and cultural spheres of African-American life in the United States. He also aco-founder of Black Science Month (October), that highlights and encourages African achievement and advancement in the S.T.E.M. fields.

Asar is a noted speaker and philosopher and is currently organizing efforts in a nation-wide venture titled The African-American Cultural Development Project—a national project aimed at creating a framework for an African-American culture which will help vitally stimulate the economic, political, scientific and cultural spheres of African-American life in the United States.

Asar has presented and submitted papers to such conferences as: 

•    National Council for Black Studies
•    National Association of Black Psychologists
•    NBUF National Conference
•    National Association of African American Studies
•    Free Minds, Free People National Conference
•    African-American Student Leadership Conference – Texas A&M
•    Women, Children, War and Violence Symposium – Texas Southern University
•    MAAFA featured speaker – New Orleans
•    African American Studies Research Symposium – University of Houston
•    ASCAC

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