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BANTU ORIGINS OF TYPHON OF GREECE

The Greek god Typhon ((/ˈtaɪfən/; Ancient Greek: Τυφῶν, Tuphōn, [typʰɔ̂ːn]), also Typhoeus (Τυφωεύς, Tuphōeus), Typhaon (Τυφάων, Tuphaōn) or Typhos (Τυφώς, Tuphōs) was the most deadly monster of Greek mythology. Wiki describes him as follows; 

Zeus battling the giant Typhon | Greek vase, Chalcidian black figure hydria

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SIMULACRUM & SIMULATION: A PHOTOGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION

intro

As many of my readers already know, within the past two years I have taken up the art of photography. I have been learning a lot and I think I am at the point now where I can start to combine my love for imagery with my love of philosophy. I am inspired by ancient African art, not only for its aesthetics, but for the symbolism for which each piece conveys.

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AFRICAN ORIGIN OF THE WORD "NIKE" -REVISED

The following paper is a preliminary examination of the Greek word Nike, which is more known to us in modern times as the name of the sports apparel conglomerate, but was historically known as the goddess of victory. I suggest in this essay that the word Nike “victory” is of Egyptian origin and that it can also be found in West Africa among the Yoruba as the god Ogun.

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KONGO AND ANCIENT EGYPTIAN CONNECTIONS: NDOKI

In our continuing discourse concerning ancient Egyptian ontological, philosophical and theological conceptualizations and correspondences with cultures found in modern Kongo, I’d like to take a brief moment to add to this ever expanding corpus of associations. Our concern in this brief note is with the Kikongo concept and lexeme ndoki.

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PER ANKH AND THE KONGO

In my 2011 book, _Passion of the Christ or Passion of Osiris: The Kongo Origins of the Jesus Myth_, I first introduced  the suggestion that the word /anx/ “Ankh” in ancient Egyptian was probably pronounced something like /nganga/ found in common Bantu (Niger-Congo) languages. This was based on linguistics in part, but more so based on a comparative cultural analysis. My recent discovery in November of 2012 that the hieroglyph, transliterated as /a/ in modern Egyptological discourses, was actually a /k/ sound, allows me now to reexamine some of my earlier analyses with fresh insights.I can say that my 2011 (2010) hypothesis is on more solid grounds and has major implications for the world of Kemetology.

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NOTES ON EGYPTIAN KA "SOUL"

EGYPTOLOGY NOTES #34: Those of us in the African school of the study of ciKam (Egypt) look to other African languages to help expand our knowledge of ancient Egyptian religious and cultural concepts that are not explicitly defined in Egyptian texts. One of those obscure concepts is known as the kA “soul” in ancient Egypt. As most of you know who follow my work, the grapheme transliterated as <A> in Egyptological literature, is actually an /l/ sound as in “Larry.” It can also double as a /r/. Thus, “ka” is more than likely not how you pronounce the term. The consonant cluster is /k-l/. By going into the inner African languages, we get a better understanding of the term.

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LINGUISTIC NOTES ON THE EGYPTIAN BA "SOUL"

EGYTOLOGY NOTES #35: On yesterday I spoke about the ciKam (Egyptian) concept of the /kA/ (k-l), which we have defined as “soul, will, self” based on comparative evidence from related languages. Today the same approach will be taken to help us understand another word for “soul” in Egyptian known as the bA. As noted previously, the grapheme transliterated as <A> (or 3) is actually an /l/ or /r/ sound. Therefore, “ba” is more than likely not how you pronounce the term; it would have a b-l consonant root (the Egyptians didn’t write their vowels). So here is the comparative data:

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THE ETYMOLOGY OF THE NAME YEMOJA AMONG THE YORUBA AND THE IFA TRADTION

To prevent a phenomenon called ‘folk-etymology’ in linguistic analyses, we do what we call a cross language comparison of terms to get at the core of their meanings that may be forgotten in one language or another. When it comes to names of deities, often a culture will forget the original meaning of the name, or they ‘forget’ because it never was a name that originated in their language. In other words, it is a borrowing. As a result of not knowing the true meaning of a term, a speech community will often try to analyze the name from within their language by trying to break the term down using words from their language that make sense to them. We in the Black community do this a lot, especially with the word “history” by trying to break it down into “His-Story.” This is an example of folk-etymology (etymology done by the common people with no knowledge of historical comparative linguistic methods for ascertaining the meaning of words).

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SOCIAL CONDITION OF WOMEN IN THE KINGDOM OF KUBA

Social Condition of Women in the Kingdom of Kuba 
(E. Torday and T.A. Joyce, 1910)

 

 

“The social position of Bushongo women is remarkable. The first personality in the kingdom is a woman, the queen-mother. Among the important people in the kingdom, women have two representatives and in the council of elders, there are several women.

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THE POWER OF GREETING

Women greeting each other in Mogadishu.
 

It’s interesting the West African philosophy of “greeting” someone in comparison to how we engage it, typically, in the U.S. In ancient Egypt, the God component of man, that spark of energy directly connected to the Greater Spirit, is called {kA} (Twi /okra/; Ga /kla/; Teke /nkira/) “soul.” In Coptic this is pronounced {ki} (in Jaba /kyu/). The front vowel caused a palatalization effect in other African languages. In Igbo it is pronounced {chi} and may be ultimately connected to the concept of “chi” in Chinese.

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THE AFRICAN CONNECTION BETWEEN LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP: LINGUISTICALLY.

In my eBook titled Where is the Love? How Language Can Reorient Us Back to Love’s Purpose (2013b), I sought to define love from an African and historical comparative linguistic standpoint. I came to the conclusion that love, ultimately, derives from a root that means “to extend one’s hand, to help, to aid”; thus making love a “verb.” There was another aspect of the overall conversation that centered on how indigenous African people conceptualized the human being, their attitude towards the person and how one’s significant other was to be viewed within the grand cosmological scheme of things. It is on the latter aspect of that discussion that I would like to elaborate on briefly here given the big upcoming “holiday” of Valentine’s Day, which is a good time for reflecting on intimate human relationships.

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A LINGUISTIC BREAKDOWN OF THE NETER SHU OF ANCIENT EGYPT

The following is a brief linguistic assessment of the signification of the neter (divinity) Šw (conventionally pronounced as [shu]) of ancient ciKam (km.t). However, before we turn to the Nile, we will start off in West Africa to provide a little clarity and context.

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ADAM AND EVE: DEMOTED EGYPTIAN GODS.

 

As I discussed in my 2013 work titled _Aaluja…_, in the ancient world, life was poetically considered the derivative of the union of a “sky-father” and “earth-mother” (with the exception of Kemet, which reversed the gender roles). A case in point is the Yoruba deity Obàtálá “the exalted king” or “The father on high,” who is a “sky” deity, and the “earth” goddess by the name of Odùduwà, from  Odù-ó da ùwà “Oracular utterances created existence.” Among the Fon, Ewe and Egun ethnic groups, the “sky” deity is Segbo (cf. Hebrew sagab “be inaccessibly high”; Yoruba òṣùgbó “exalted elders”) and the earth goddess is Sakpata (cf. Ga šikpón “earth”).

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A LINGUISTIC LOOK AT THE NOAH STORY

With the upcoming release of the film NOAH (2014) starring Russell Crowe (see trailer here:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_OSaJE2rqxU) , I felt it necessary to discuss one of the main themes of the film through the lens of comparative linguistics and religion. This brief note focuses on the ark built by Noah, and what the Hebrew name of the ark ultimately informs us about the storyline that might get missed by those who do not understand Hebrew.

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IS YOUR SPOUSE HOLDING YOU BACK FROM SUCCESS?

Research shows that behind every successful person, there is a strong supportive spouse. The correlation between business success and choosing the right spouse is so strong that people like Patti Novak suggests that choosing the right mate can make or break your success. Success means different things to different people. In this discussion, we will focus on business success as it relates to entrepreneurship and to see if there is a correlation between success in business and choosing the right mate.

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POSTURE AND MEANING: INTERPRETING EGYPTIAN ART THROUGH A KONGO CULTURAL LENS

I have been engaged in some recent debates concerning the possible relationship between ancient Egyptians and modern West African cultures. In the midst of the discussion I presented some images for comparison of West African art sculptures that resemble the Bes figure of ancient Egypt. In the midst of this debate I noticed something about the figures that may make an even stronger case for cross continental and cultural influence. If it wasn’t for the debate I probably wouldn’t have noticed this.

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EGYPTIAN A BANTU NATION, LITERALLY: RMT = LUNTU, SOME NOTES

These are just some notes to expand our understanding of the Ancient Egyptian word given as RMT(j), meaning ‘people’. This is clearly a Niger-Congo word and is rendered in Tshiluba as LUNTU. I will go with the convention of calling KMT ciKam espoused by the likes of Oscar Pfouma and Mubabinge Bilolo. It is becoming apparent that the terminating feminine -t suffix is actually a prefix with the sound value of TSTSH which in the Luba language becomes Ci, Tshi; and the letter D is read as Dye / Dje.

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THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN ADINKRA PROJECT

hug

The aim of the African-American Cultural Development Project (AACDP) is to develop a paradigm and framework for a shared African-American culture across the United States. For our purposes, culture stands on these four pillars: history, creative-motifcos-mythology and ethos. In this brief discussion we will focus on one aspect ofcreative-motif and that is symbolism. The purpose of this essay is to introduce one aspect of the cultural development project and that is the creation of our own African-American signs and symbols that function, in many ways, like the Adinkra symbols among the Akan of Ghana.

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